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This picture is of one of “Blueprint Cleanse” cleanses called the “I Choose Foundation” designed to focus on green vegetables.

Photo from: Blueprint Cleanse

This picture is of one of “Blueprint Cleanse” cleanses called the “I Choose Foundation” designed to focus on green vegetables.

Fat-Busting Fads

October 20, 2015

People all over the world have recently been indulging in different dietary and exercise fads to help stay in good physical condition. Whether it’s going vegan, gluten free when it’s not necessary, green smoothies, or juice cleanses, lots of people seem to be reaping the benefits, but will society grasp the cold hard facts of different dietary pathways?

“Juice Cleanses” (also known as “Juice Fasts”) are the meal plans where the only thing on the menu is different juiced foods. You can juice fruits, you can juice vegetables, and you can even add nutrients and spices to these juices such as pepper and chlorophyll.

These diets call for the drinking of six to twelve bottles of prepackaged juices a day from different juiceries around America. Pressed Juicery sells a juice for $6.50 a bottle. Only a little more than a Starbucks, right? If you have to have six to twelve a day, the cleanses can get pricey.  Pressed Juicery sells their three-day juice cleanses for $200. Is it worth the money?

The entire point of juice cleanses is to cleanse your body of its toxins. The director of Sports Nutrition at the University of California, Liz Applegate, stated, “The body does not need any help in getting rid of toxins.” The main stigma against juice cleanses is the fact that the body already cleanses itself of its toxins through natural means.

The other reason many doctors aren’t liking juice cleanses is because it starts a starvation cycle that people don’t think about. Cari Nierenberg with livescience.com said these specific regimens “could send the body into starvation mode, meaning it will try to conserve calories by slowing down metabolism, because the body is unsure when it will be fed again.” By causing this “starvation mode” the body goes into, the cleanse is doing exactly the opposite of what it was intended to do, which is make your body healthier and feeling better.

This is one of over 20 locations of the famous “Pressed Juicery” located all over California and New York

Photo from: Pressed Juicery
This is one of over 20 locations of the famous “Pressed Juicery” located all over California and New York

Juice cleanses are done by many celebrities such as Blake Lively, Kim Kardashian, and Kate Hudson. The kicker of this high priced trend is that you are said to lose about seven to ten pounds per week, according to LiveStrong.com, if you do the complete meal plan without cheating.

As someone who has attempted and completed a juice cleanse before, it is way harder than it seems. I started the easy cleanse (a one-day cleanse from Pressed Juicery based in Los Angeles, California). The first couple hours went well. Despite frequenting every public restroom I passed by, I was feeling well. Though my body felt fine, my mouth did not. The juices tasted completely awful. By mid-day, I was so hungry. Being a foodie, I couldn’t finish the cleanse before cheating, but even though I was unable to pull through, I know many people who do juice cleanses monthly.

Though many celebrities take part in the juice cleanses, it seems to be frowned upon by doctors. Of course the obvious benefits such as getting a good amount of fruit and vegetable nutrients still exist, but overall, it seems to be an unhealthy activity to partake in.

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